I like to tie the mesh bag and dive flag to the handle of the keep and sling the barrier net over my shoulder. That way I am able to swim/walk with one arm and my legs and just have the consolidated bundle to lug. If i see a neat fish i drop the handle and then lay out the barrier. Using the barrier net is a bit of a trick. Most fish react to humans are they would react to a turtle, we are floaty and awkward but not too menacing and so they just watch us closely. If we get close they start to swim away or if they are territorial they shrink back into their shelter. If we get too close, most fish hide. The key is intimidating the swimmy fish, angels/butterflies/tangs/wrasses/chromis to swim into your barrier. To do this usually you need to swim a wide loop around the fish putting them between you and the barrier then approach them fast enough that they are watching backwards and not forwards but slow enough that they don't dive under a rock or startle in a random direction. Just before they hit the net dive on them and if you are lucky they are still bumbling against the mesh wall when you swim down and either pinch them into your barrier by folding it over them, or sweep them up with your hand net. When i sweep i arc up so that I´m pulling the fish towards the surface. A panicked fish's tendency is to swim down and so it will hopefully stay in the bottom of the net. Something to note, there is a specific size fish head that will inevitably get stuck in your barrier net. For me it's usually wrasses or small grunts but the worst is a school of herring/shad. I once had to untangle 100+ shiny little fish from my barrier who all swam in when i wasn't even around. When i got back to my net there was a punch of mangrove snapper and a small barracuda smashing through the net eating the little fish. The key to getting little fish out it to push on their nose strait backwards and a bit upwards so that their forehead slips out first. It their first dorsal spine or gills are through the net try to untangle those first.

Here is a YouTube video showing activity similar to how I collect though the Caribbean fish don't seem to get as caught up in the barrier and so I need to fold them up or sweep them in the hand net pretty quickly. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVrKrYkHfXc

Here is a video of a type of net that is good for chasing little fish into with your other hand and a person who got lucky just swooping at fish. For this even a green net works better than the slow plastic nets. The other guy in this video has one of the "glass" nets i described earlier which is in my opinion a better net. I want to emphasize that swooping at the fish with a net isn't often very successful as they are way faster than us. The key is to have them swim into your net.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVcZD2RBZkM

A note on slurp guns: I've tried a number of small and large ones and they just aren't good at getting stuff. If anyone has advice or experience on how to use them for catching specific fish better than you could with a net please let me know

Here is a link to a Google map with annotations about where to collect and what you may find there. There are a few spots where you can just wade in or even stay dry and collect inverts at low tides. https://www.google.com/maps/ms?msid=207676602677621554618.0004defd768c04...

Here is a map I made earlier showing where to collect lithopoma (Florida astrea/florida turbo) snails.https://www.google.com/maps/ms?msid=207676602677621554618.0004c715d41455...